The Moral Case for Tax Cuts: New at Reason

The ownership of tax money before the government confiscates it is a moral consideration, or at least ought to be.

A. Barton Hinkle writes:

Say you walk into a store one day and there's a big sign inside: "Everything Now 20 Percent Off." What is your reaction?

(a) "This is great! I am going to save some money today!"

(b) "This is terrible! I demand to know how the store is going to make up the revenue. And I am outraged, because people who are richer than I am buy more stuff, which means they will save more money than I do!"

If you are a normal person, your reaction is more likely to resemble (a). But a lot of people—including most members of the media—apparently have a reaction more like (b), at least when the subject turns to taxes.

View this article.

The Moral Case for Tax Cuts: New at Reason

The ownership of tax money before the government confiscates it is a moral consideration, or at least ought to be.

A. Barton Hinkle writes:

Say you walk into a store one day and there's a big sign inside: "Everything Now 20 Percent Off." What is your reaction?

(a) "This is great! I am going to save some money today!"

(b) "This is terrible! I demand to know how the store is going to make up the revenue. And I am outraged, because people who are richer than I am buy more stuff, which means they will save more money than I do!"

If you are a normal person, your reaction is more likely to resemble (a). But a lot of people—including most members of the media—apparently have a reaction more like (b), at least when the subject turns to taxes.

View this article.