Will Consumer Privacy Initiatives Slow the Internet Economy?: New at Reason

California is looking to grant its residents more "rights" related to internet use.

Steven Greenhut writes:

As the legislative session ends, California political junkies will soon turn their attention to the slate of initiatives making their way to the November 2018 ballot. One of the more significant proposed statewide measures is the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, which would give consumers the "right" to know what information businesses collect and to stop them from using it for commercial purposes.

The initiative promises consumers "control" over the personal information businesses glean from "tracking and collection devices"—and seeks to restore privacy rights at a time of "accelerating encroachment on personal freedom and security." It would apply to all businesses, ranging from internet service providers to websites to cellphone companies.

The proposal has sparked concern in tech-friendly California, given that it could impose significant costs on everything from small-time websites to major internet players such as Facebook, Google and Amazon. If the measure qualifies for the ballot and is approved by voters, it would apply not only to California-based internet companies, but to any entity that does business in the state. So, it could have national reverberations.

"Forcing companies to allow consumers to opt out of tracking, and not allowing those companies to charge more or deny service to consumers who do opt out, would be burdensome for websites and application developers, and would significantly hurt the advertising industry since it would decrease the amount of targeted advertising they can do," said Tom Struble, tech policy manager at the R Street Institute in Washington, D.C.

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