No Picture

Health Care Costs Are the Reason You’re Not Getting a Raise: New at Reason

09/23/2017 Shikha Dalmia 0

Every Labor Day you can count on seeing a spate of news stories saying that “real wages” in the United States haven’t grown since the 1970s. That’s true, more or less, but the reason for the stagnation might surprise you. It’s a complex story, but it boils down to this: Blame health care costs.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, inflation-adjusted wages have grown by just 2.7 percent in the last 40 years. But inflation-adjusted total compensation—wages plus fringe benefits, such as health insurance, disability insurance, and paid vacation, along with employer-paid Social Security and Medicare taxesincreased by more than 60 percent in the same period.

Wages still make up a significant share of your total compensation: 68.3 percent, according to 2017 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, vs. 31.7 percent that goes to benefits. But that latter piece has grown significantly, in no small part due to the rising cost of health insurance. And that trend is only going to get worse, writes Veronique de Rugy.

View this article.

No Picture

Health Care Costs Are the Reason You’re Not Getting a Raise: New at Reason

09/23/2017 Shikha Dalmia 0

Every Labor Day you can count on seeing a spate of news stories saying that “real wages” in the United States haven’t grown since the 1970s. That’s true, more or less, but the reason for the stagnation might surprise you. It’s a complex story, but it boils down to this: Blame health care costs.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, inflation-adjusted wages have grown by just 2.7 percent in the last 40 years. But inflation-adjusted total compensation—wages plus fringe benefits, such as health insurance, disability insurance, and paid vacation, along with employer-paid Social Security and Medicare taxesincreased by more than 60 percent in the same period.

Wages still make up a significant share of your total compensation: 68.3 percent, according to 2017 data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, vs. 31.7 percent that goes to benefits. But that latter piece has grown significantly, in no small part due to the rising cost of health insurance. And that trend is only going to get worse, writes Veronique de Rugy.

View this article.